Art Nouveau Enamel Pendant

Art Nouveau Enamel Pendant

I thought you may enjoy seeing this absolutely gorgeous gilded 800 silver cloisonné enamelled filigree pendant just in the Elder and Bloom Store.

If you are interested in learning more about enamel techniques in antique jewellery, you may enjoy these articles here.

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Categories of Necklaces

In a previous post, I described the names for the different lengths of pearl necklaces.  These length names can also apply to other necklaces.  I have also discussed the different types of chains in another post.  Necklaces can also be categorized using the different terms as outlined below:

Bavette

A bavette is a necklace made of different lengths brought together at the clasp.

The word ‘bavette’ comes from the French word meaning ‘bib’.

AN ANTIQUE NATURAL PEARL AND DIAMOND NECKLACE

AN ANTIQUE NATURAL PEARL AND DIAMOND NECKLACE
Christie’s Sale 3011

Bib

A bib necklace is a necklace which has a bib like shape, with hanging strands of beads or gemstones or other decorative elements.

Necklace

England, c. 1867
Necklace enameled gold, hung with cameos of chalcedony and onyx
Firm of John Brogden
V&A Museum

Chute

A ‘chute’ refers to a pearl necklace with smaller pearls near the clasp.

A natural pearl necklace

A natural pearl necklace.
Christie’s Sale 8127

Collière d’Esclavage (Slave Necklace)

These were particularly popular during the Georgian era.

These necklaces are characterized as cameos or plaques or other decorative elements connected by chains or cords.

Necklace

Rome, c. 1810
Necklace, micromosaics, cut blue glass and moulded gold
V&A Museum

Dog Collar (Collier de Chien)

This is a necklace that fits close to the neck, normally quite wide.

The fashion, widespread in the Edwardian era, was begun by Queen Alexandra who reportedly wore them to hide a scar on her neck.

Queen Alexandra, Princess of Wales Wearing a Dog Collar

Fringe Necklace

This is a necklace which has dangling elements circling the neck.

This style was particularly popularized in the archaeological revival styles of the late 19th century and again in the 1950s.

Necklace

England, late 19th century
Necklace, gold and Egyptian beads
V&A Museum

Lariat

Lariat necklaces have a noose shape that goes around the neck. They can be tightened by pulling the ends of the necklace up toward the throat or loosened by pulling the necklace downward.

A GOLD AND MULTI-GEM LARIAT NECKLACE, BY ILIAS LALAOUNIS

A GOLD AND MULTI-GEM LARIAT NECKLACE, BY ILIAS LALAOUNIS
Christie’s Sale 2177

Lavallière (lavalier or lavaliere)

This refers to a necklace, usually of chain, with a single drop pendant, often a pearl.

This style of necklace was especially popular around 1900.

The name comes from Louise Françoise de La Baume Le Blanc, duchesse de La Vallière (1644-1710), mistress of Louis XIV.

Coincidentally, lavallière it is also the French word for ‘cravat’.

A CULTURED PEARL AND DIAMOND PENDENT NECKLACE, BY CARTIER

A CULTURED PEARL AND DIAMOND PENDENT NECKLACE, BY CARTIER
Christie’s Sale 2968

Medallion

This is a type of pendant, usually disc or circular shaped.

Medallion

England, c. 1787
White Jasper with a black relief and mounted in gilt-metal
Medallion worn by advocates for the abolition of slavery.
V&A Museum

Négligée

This is a necklace comprised often of fine chain links but not necessarily with two parallel pendants suspended at slightly different heights.

This type of necklace began to be popular around 1900.

AN ART DECO EMERALD AND DIAMOND NECKLACE

AN ART DECO EMERALD AND DIAMOND NECKLACE
Christie’s Sale 1362

Pendant

A pendant refers to a singular decorative element usually hanging from a chain or ribbon, but can also be hanging from a beaded or other kind of necklace.

A BELLE ÉPOQUE DIAMOND PENDANT NECKLACE
A BELLE ÉPOQUE DIAMOND PENDANT NECKLACE
Christie’s Sale 2604

Rivière

These are necklaces made of gemstones all of the same size or graduating that go all the way around the necklace.

Popular since around 1750 until today.

Necklace

England, c. 1800
Necklace pastes in silver and gold
V&A Museum

Sautoir

A sautoir is a long necklace with an ornament or tassel hanging from the bottom.

The fashion for sautoir necklaces became particularly very popular in the early part of the 20th century through the Art Deco period.

Necklace

France, c. 1920
Sautoir necklace of seed pearls, diamonds and platinum.
V&A Museum

Torsade

A torsade is a necklace or bracelet comprised of lengths of beads or chain that are twisted.

A seed pearl, sapphire and diamond torsade and a pair of gem-set earrings

A seed pearl, sapphire and diamond torsade and a pair of gem-set earrings
Christie’s Sale 6169

Sources / further reading:

http://www.langantiques.com/university/index.php/Necklace_Styles

Pearl necklace lengths

” A woman needs ropes and ropes of pearls” – Coco Chanel

To continue on from my post yesterday, ‘Pearl Basics’, I am going to discuss the names of the different lengths of pearl necklaces (and, in fact, all necklaces).

Collar.

This measures 10 to 13 inches or 25 to 33 cm in length.  It sits directly against the throat and does not hang.  Collars can be a single strand or a multiple strands of pearls.

Caterina Sagredo Barbarigo by Rosalba Carriera, cir. 1740. Wearing a single-strand pearl collar and pendant pearl earrings

Pearl choker

This measures 14 to 16 inches or 35 to 41 cm in length.  It nestles just at the base of the neck.

Princess length.

This measures 17 to 19 inches or 43 to 48 cm in length.  It comes down to or just below the collarbone.

Matinee length

This measures 20 to 24 inches or 50 to 60 cm in length and it falls just above the breasts.

Opera length

This measures 28 to 35 inches or 70 to 90 cm in length.  It usually reaches the breastbone or sternum.

Pearl rope or Sautoir

This measures more than 45 inches or 115 cm in length. It is any length that falls down farther than an opera.

Queen of Italy, Margherita of Savoy is wearing a multi-strand choker and a rope of pearls, possibly with matching bracelet and earrings

Necklaces can also be classified as uniform or graduated. Freshwater pearls, Tahitian pearls and South Sea pearls must all measure to within a millimeter to be considered uniform. They are called ‘tin-cup’ when they are separated by lengths of chain.

Sources / further reading:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearl

http://thenewyorkfashionpost.blogspot.de/2007/12/pearls-and-pearls-again.html

http://www.silvershake.com/store/pearl/pearl_silver_jewelry_pearls_jewellery_guide.html

Coral Jewelry in Artwork 1619 -1939

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Louis Édouard Rioult – Portrait Of A Lady Wearing Coral Jewellery

Antique, untreated coral is one of the most loved of materials in antique jewelry.  It is considered to be one of the ‘organic gemstones’ (the other two being amber and jet and pearls). Women who first own a piece of old coral jewelry soon become addicted to it and tend to become collectors.  There is something truly sumptuous and almost edible about antique, untreated coral.  It has long been worn as a talisman and later for its pure beauty; it was considered by the Victorians to promote good health and vitality, and you can really believe that it does once you experience wearing it.

One of the wonderful things about coral is that it tends to adapt over time to the woman who is wearing it and will subtly change color in a very organic way.  Many women have reported a feeling of ‘rightness’ about their particular piece of coral jewelry, as though the piece is actually part of them. Coral ranges from white, to ‘Angel Skin’, to ‘Salmon’, to ‘Oxblood’ and every nuance in between.

Since ancient Rome, coral has been considered to be protective for children and in the Georgian and Victorian era children were often given carved coral rattles. Children were also given coral earrings, bracelets and necklaces to wear. There are many works of art from Regency, Victorian and the early 20th century that show coral being worn by both women and children.  Looking at old works of art can be a truly wonderful way of understanding antique jewelry. I really got quite carried away finding these beautiful images on the Internet and had to make myself stop! (If I haven’t put the artists name it’s because I don’t know; if you do know please do send me a message or make a comment so I can add it).  I would like to share some of these truly lovely art works with coral jewelry here:
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Robert Lefevre.
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School of Andrea Appiani, Elisa Bonaparte
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Regency children, John Hoppner, 1796.  Girl on left is wearing a coral necklace.
Generally, girls only wore very simple jewelry until about ages 15 or 16.
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Young Regency woman in coral necklace
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 Lady in coral earrings, oil painting circa 1820, currently for sale here
Nicolaas Rubens Wearing a Coral Necklace, Peter Paul Rubens, c. 1619
Jane Elizabeth, Countess of Oxford, by John Hoppner 1797
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Portrait Miniature
Christies Sale 7817,
The Manolo March Collection From Son Galcerán, Mallorca
28 – 29 October 2009
London, King Street
Lady Maria Hamilton, Thomas Lawrence, 1802
Little boy with dog and coral necklace (it is unclear if dogs were sometimes given coral collars or if the child is giving the dog his own necklace) – Martin Drolling.
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Portrait of a German Princess, 1828, François-Joseph Kinson

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Nude with coral necklace, 1910, Auguste Macke, Sprengel Museum Hanover

Portrait of a Lady with a Coral Necklace, Charles Webster Hawthorne, 1872-1930
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‘Coral Earrings’ by Frederick Carl Frieseke (1874-1939)